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 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 501

Branch retinal vein occlusion and COVID-19 vaccination: Correspondence


1 Private Academic Consultant, Dimapur, Nagaland, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Dr. DY Patil University, Pune, Maharashtra, India

Date of Submission17-Jul-2022
Date of Acceptance03-Sep-2022
Date of Web Publication02-Nov-2022

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Won Sriwijitalai
Private Academic Consultant, Dimapur, 797103
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2211-5056.360248

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How to cite this article:
Sriwijitalai W, Wiwanitkit V. Branch retinal vein occlusion and COVID-19 vaccination: Correspondence. Taiwan J Ophthalmol 2022;12:501

How to cite this URL:
Sriwijitalai W, Wiwanitkit V. Branch retinal vein occlusion and COVID-19 vaccination: Correspondence. Taiwan J Ophthalmol [serial online] 2022 [cited 2023 Jan 28];12:501. Available from: https://www.e-tjo.org/text.asp?2022/12/4/501/360248



Dear Editor,

We would like to share ideas on the publication “Branch retinal vein occlusion (RVO) post severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 vaccination.[1]” Two intriguing RVO cases were described by Tanaka et al.[1] They also observed that both instances suggested a probable link between the SARS-CoV-2 vaccination and the initial beginning of RVO.[1] Clinical medicine emphasizes the clinical influence of the COVID-19 vaccine on other systems notwithstanding the possibility of negative vaccination-related side effects. It may or may not have been a negative vaccine side effect that caused the seizure noted in the recent study. Little is known about the recipient's physical, hematological, ocular, or immunological status before immunization. Because there is no conclusive proof connecting immunization to RVO, making a decision is difficult. Even after receiving vaccinations, a person may already be unwell. The vaccine recipient could also develop a different disease. A co-infection may also appear following the COVID-19 vaccine.[2] For instance, dengue can result in ocular problems if it co-occurs.[3],[4] It is necessary to conduct another prospective analysis of the COVID-19 vaccine's effects on individuals with complete clinical histories. When an incidence has been recorded, a comprehensive laboratory analysis is required to rule out other possibilities.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

The authors declare that there are no conflicts of interests of this paper.



 
  References Top

1.
Tanaka H, Nagasato D, Nakakura S, Nagasawa T, Wakuda H, Kurusu A, et al. Branch retinal vein occlusion post severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 vaccination. Taiwan J Ophthalmol 2022;12:202-5.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Kebayoon A, Wiwanitkit V. Dengue after COVID-19 vaccination: Possible and might be missed. Clin Appl Thromb Hemost 2021;27:10760296211047229.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Velaitham P, Vijayasingham N. Central retinal vein occlusion concomitant with dengue fever. Int J Retina Vitreous 2016;2:1.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Sanjay S, Anilkumar A, Mahendradas P, Kawali A, Priya BV, Shetty BK. Inflammatory branch retinal artery and vein occlusion with panuveitis secondary to dengue fever. Indian J Ophthalmol 2020;68:1958-60.  Back to cited text no. 4
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