• Users Online: 284
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
 
REVIEW ARTICLE
Ahead of Print

Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty in eyes with glaucoma


1 Stein Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA; College of Medicine, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
2 Stein Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; Cornea Department, Cochin Hospital, Paris Cité Université, Paris, France
3 Stein Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Correspondence Address:
Sophie X Deng,
Stein Eye Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, 200 Stein Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/2211-5056.361277

Endothelial keratoplasty has become the standard for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction. In Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK), only the endothelium and Descemet membrane are transplanted, providing superior outcomes compared to Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty (DSEK). A substantial subset of patients who require DMEK have comorbid glaucoma. Even in eyes with complex anterior segment such as eyes with previous trabeculectomy or tube shunts, DMEK can restore meaningful vision and outperforms DSEK in terms of visual recovery, decreased rejection rate, and the need for high dose of topical steroids. However, accelerated endothelial cell loss and secondary graft failure have been described in eyes with previous glaucoma surgery, namely trabeculectomy and drainage device. During DMEK and DSEK procedures, raised intraocular pressure is required to attach the graft, which could worsen preexisting glaucoma or cause de novo glaucoma. Mechanisms of postoperative ocular hypertension include delayed air clearance, pupillary block, steroid response, and damage to angle structures. Medically treated glaucoma has increased risk for postoperative ocular hypertension. By understanding these additional complications and making appropriate modifications in surgical techniques and postoperative management, DMEK can be performed successfully and achieve very good visual outcome in eyes with glaucoma. Such modifications include precisely controlled unfolding technique, iridectomies that can help avoid pupillary block, tube shunts that can be trimmed to facilitate graft unfolding, air fill tension that can be adjusted, and postoperative steroid regimens that can be modified to decrease the risk for steroid response. Long-term survival of the DMEK graft, however, is shorter in eyes with previous glaucoma surgery than those without, as observed after other types of keratoplasty.


Print this article
Search
 Back
 
  Search Pubmed for
 
    -  Le B
    -  Bonnet C
    -  Yung M
    -  Deng SX
 Citation Manager
 Article Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed245    
    PDF Downloaded4    

Recommend this journal